Thirty years of anthropometric changes relevant to the width and depth of transportation seating spaces, present and future

Johan Molenbroek, Thomas J Albin, Peter Vink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)
119 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of an investigation into changes in body shape anthropometry over the past several decades and discusses the impact of those changes on seating in transport, especially airliners. Changes in some body shape dimensions were confirmed in a sample of students at TU Delft; several of the changes, e.g. hip breadth, seated, are relevant to the ongoing design of seating. No change in buttock knee length was observed. The fit between current user anthropometry and current airline seat design, especially regarding seat width, was investigated. A comparison of the average current seat breadth with global anthropometric data suggests that accommodation may be problematic, with less than optimal width for passengers’ shoulder and elbow widths.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-138
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Ergonomics: human factors in technology and society
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Airline seating
  • Anthropometry
  • Secular trends in anthropometry
  • Transportation seating

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